A study on the holidays throughout the year

Prev Chronic Dis ; Methods A systematic search of PubMed and Embase was conducted. Reference lists of identified articles and Google Scholar were also reviewed. Studies that assessed summer weight gain in school children were included.

A study on the holidays throughout the year

While images of love and joy fill storefronts, TV screens and magazine pages, for many people, the reality of the holidays isn't so cheerful. Between stressful end-of-year deadlines, family dysfunction and loss, poor eating and drinking habits, and increasingly cold and dark winter days, it's easy for the holiday season to feel not-so-merry and bright.

Constant reminders of others' happy seasons can additionally serve as a painful reminder of the happiness and love that's lacking in our own lives. For this reason, the month of December can be a particularly difficult time of year for those dealing with family conflict, loss, break-ups, divorce, loneliness and mental health issues.

Feelings of depression and negative mood affect many people at the holidays, and not just those who have been diagnosed with clinical depression. While there hasn't been data to suggest an actual rise in depression rates and suicides in December -- research has found that depression and suicide actually peak in the Spring -- some experts say that the holiday blues are a very real phenomenon.

And of course, there's plenty of anecdotal evidence to suggest that this is the case. Here are some of the risk factors of holiday depression, and how you can avoid them.

Learning About Holidays. Holidays are important markers of cultural identity that help people worldwide celebrate their values, beliefs, and traditions. Watch video · That way, our study ranks the states based on the criteria they use to sell themselves. This year some states were tied. Learn more about our categories and methodology. Spending Elul thinking about holiday recipes is a wonderful way to prepare for the New Year, a time during which we often host friends and family. Often, fond memories of Jewish holidays center on family gatherings and delicious meals.

Setting up unrealistic expectations. Hoping for a picture-perfect White Christmas holiday is setting yourself up for not only disappointment, but potentially depression. There's often strife within families that comes out at holiday times. If holidays tend to be a time of conflict in your family, or you've recently experienced the loss of a loved one, putting pressure on your family to all get along or to be cheerful could lead to disappointment and additional anxiety.

Being mindful of what you do have to be thankful for -- your sister who always makes family gatherings bearable, getting a week off of work, or just the promise of a fresh start with the beginning of the new year -- can help combat feelings of deficiency and lack.

At the holidays, the pressure of trying to do everything -- plan the perfect holiday, make it home to see your family, say yes to every event, meet those year-end deadlines -- can be enough to send anyone into a tail spin.

And if you're prone to anxiety and depression, stress and a lack of sleep can take a significant toll on your mood. A heightened pressure and fear of not getting everything done are some of the most common triggers for the holiday blues, according to Sichel.

A study on the holidays throughout the year

Both in real life and on social media, it can be difficult to avoid comparing yourself with others around Christmastime. If you have a less-than-perfect family, a past trauma from this time of year, or just a less-than-full holiday dance card, comparing your holiday experience with other peoples' is a recipe for increased sadness and isolation.

And as Sichel points out, these comparisons tend to be skewed -- and they tend to make us feel bad about ourselves.

For many people, December is the busiest time of the year. When work pressures pile up and the calendar gets full with social obligations, the routines that normally keep us healthy and happy -- yoga class, morning runs, healthy home-cooked meals, a meditation practice -- are usually the first thing to fall by the wayside.

In addition to increased stress, eating poorly and drinking excessively can also exacerbate issues like stress, anxiety and depression.

Alcohol is everywhere during the holidays, and if you're struggling with feeling down, it may be wise to avoid drinking as much as possible -- alcohol is known to worsen symptoms of anxiety and depression. Experiencing symptoms of Seasonal Affective Disorder.

If you tend to start feeling down when winter approaches each year, and those negative feelings don't go away after the holidays are over, you may have Seasonal Affective Disorder SAD. According to Sichel, many people who think they are suffering from a case of holiday blues may actually be suffering from SAD, a form of depression that's brought on by the change of seasons.

But SAD shouldn't be dismissed as mere "winter blues" -- talk to your doctor if you're experiencing symptoms of the disorder to find a treatment that works for you.Learning About Holidays. Holidays are important markers of cultural identity that help people worldwide celebrate their values, beliefs, and traditions.

Brian Wansink, PhD, co-author of the new study, says that collecting weight measurements over a full year helped the researchers obtain accurate, real-life results—and, in doing so, helped show that holiday weight gain may be subtle, but that it really does happen.

The holidays are a time for celebration and family – not to put on weight or become unhealthy. It's almost as if we've come to accept that we're going to put on weight during the holiday season.

Watch video · That way, our study ranks the states based on the criteria they use to sell themselves. This year some states were tied. Learn more about our categories and methodology. During the academic year all students may work a maximum of twenty hours per week.

This rule stands true for Federal Work Study eligible students, non-work study students, international students, and U.S.

resident students. The Seasonal Timing of Work-Related Injuries October Brooks Pierce1 1Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2 Massachusetts Ave. NE, Washington, DC Abstract The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (SOII) is an establishment.

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